Wellesbourne and Walton

Parish Council

2 School Road, Wellesbourne, CV35 9NH

01789 841434

Old Wellesbourne

1 Chestnut Square from Stratford Road end: The Square is surrounded by 17th to 19th century houses from those of modest tradesmen to the almost great. (Chestnut Square, Wellesbourne 1920s) (Antona – Warwickshire County Record Office PH 350/2523)

2 Chestnut Square from Stratford Road end: The Square is surrounded by 17th to 19th century houses from those of modest tradesmen to the almost great. (Chestnut Square with the Stag’s Head on the right, Wellesbourne 1960)(Warwickshire County Record Office PH 352/193/52)

3 Chestnut Square tree and pub: The chestnut tree shown is the one under which in 1872 Joseph Arch from Barford addressed a considerable outdoor gathering of farm labourers, which led to the formation of their first trade union. Candles were stuck into its bark for illumination. The tree died in 1949 and has been twice replaced. (The Stag’s Head and chestnut tree, Wellesbourne June 6th 1939)

4 Stag’s Head 1913/ 1920’s: The building dates from the early 17th century, pre-dating its use as a pub, which only began in 1837. It was run by the Baker family until 1975. (The Stag Inn, Wellesbourne 1913)(Warwickshire County Record Office PH 146/21)2523)

5 Stag’s Head 1913/ 1920’s: The building dates from the early 17th century, pre-dating its use as a pub, which only began in 1837. It was run by the Baker family until 1975. (The Stags Head in Wellesbourne, a thatched, timber framed building standing on the corner of Bridge Street and Church Walk 1920s) (Antona – Warwickshire County Record Office PH 352/193/30)

6 Chestnut Square from Chapel Street showing Co op: The Co-op (which closed around 1950) replaced a grocery first opened in 1886 in 13 Chestnut Square, originally one house with its neighbour, built in the mid-17th century. (Wellesbourne Bridge Street showing The Stags Head Inn and the Co-op Stores) (Warwickshire County Record Office PH(N)600/522/1)

7 Chestnut Square from Chapel Street showing Co op: The Co-op (which closed around 1950) replaced a grocery first opened in 1886 in 13 Chestnut Square, originally one house with its neighbour, built in the mid-17th century. (Wellesbourne Bridge Street showing The Stags Head Inn and the Co-op Stores) (Warwickshire County Record Office PH(N)600/522/1)

8 The Barracks: Until demolition in the1960s The Barracks in School Road was one of the oldest buildings in the village – its core was late medieval with 16th century additions. Originally a farmhouse, owned in the 17th century by the Jackson family, it was later subdivided into three cottages and acquired its name which is a local term for a block of dwellings and has no military connections. (Houses in School Lane, Wellesbourne. 1960s) (R. Smith Warwick County Planning Department Warwickshire County Record Office PH 146/5)

9 The Barracks: Until demolition in the1960s The Barracks in School Road was one of the oldest buildings in the village – its core was late medieval with 16th century additions. Originally a farmhouse, owned in the 17th century by the Jackson family, it was later subdivided into three cottages and acquired its name which is a local term for a block of dwellings and has no military connections.The cottage at right angles to it was built in the old roadway which once led to a crossing of the river into Chapel Street. (Houses in School Lane, Wellesbourne 1960s) (R. Smith Warwick County Planning Department Warwickshire County Record Office PH 146/2)

10 Willow Drive farmhouse: This was a farmhouse until its demolition in the 1960s when the Willowdene estate was built on some of its fields. It was owned by the Hopper family in the 17th and early 18th centuries and then became part of the estate of the Mordaunt family of Walton. (Houses in School Lane, Wellesbourne. 1960s) (R. Smith Warwick County Planning Department Warwickshire County Record Office PH 146/1)

11 Cottage in School Road: This was demolished in the 1960s; it is shown with its pump in Gordon Winter A Country Camera, one of the first books of old country photographs. (Houses in School Lane, Wellesbourne 1960s)(R. Smith Warwick County Planning Department Warwickshire County Record Office PH 146/3)

12 Cottages in School Road: Again demolished in the 1960s. The cottage nearest the camera had been a beerhouse in the early 19th century. The break in the street frontages marks the position of the Barracks which was set back from the road. (Houses in School Lane, Wellesbourne 1960s) (Warwickshire County Record Office PH352/193/18)

13 Church: Note the pinnacles, which were removed in the Second World War for aircraft safety. (Exterior of St. Peter’s Church, Wellesbourne 1920s )(Warwickshire County Record Office PH 146/7)

14 School bonfire: The man with a cap on the right of the picture is the dynamic and successful headmaster (from 1896 to 1936): Edward Frost (Wellesbourne school bonfire 1914) (Warwickshire County Record Office PH352/193/18)3)

15 Bridge Street shops: The nearest shop was then a general stores managed by G H Thomas who created the tea gardens on Warwick Road (see 25). Beyond it is the cycle shop run by Henry Turner which was to develop into Bridge Garage under his descendants, with a further general store beyond. Captain Pearson who owned the car lived in Church Street, as did his widow, a parish councillor, until after the war. The motor car which is standing outside the garage in Bridge Street, is a 14.4 H.P. Armstrong Siddeley which was registered by Mr T.S. Pearson of The Cottage, Wellesbourne, in 1924 (Warwickshire County Record Office PH 352/193/7)

16 Bridge Street from Dog Close end: Unchanged views here except for the buildings ancillary to Wellesbourne Manor which project above its long wall, and had gone by the time the later photograph was taken. (Bridge Street, Wellesbourne 1910s )(Warwickshire County Record Office PH 352/193/43)7)

17 WI hut: This was an ex-army hut, the base for the very active WI until its move to the more solid Village Hall in 1962; also remembered as a lively scene of dances and film shows. The recently demolished Cole’s Garage, founded in 1924, may be seen at the end of the street on the right. (Bridge Street, Wellesbourne, including the Women’s Institute building 1920s )(Antona – Warwickshire County Record Office PH 352/193/24)

18 Bridge Street from Dog Close end: Unchanged views here except for the buildings ancillary to Wellesbourne Manor which project above its long wall, and had gone by the time the later photograph was taken. (Bridge Street looking towards Chestnut Square 1920s) (Warwickshire County Record Office PH 352/193/21)

19 Church Street from junction with Bridge Street plus tree: One of the more striking of the many trees in Wellesbourne Hastings. Emsdene, originally two 17th century cottages, progressing from farmhouse to butcher’s shop to gentleman’s residence, can just be seen behind the chestnut tree. Church Street, Wellesbourne 1910s (Warwickshire County Record Office PH 352/193/44

20 Church Street looking towards School Road 1910s: This gives a good side view of the farmhouse shown in 10. Beyond it can just be seen the house which was the village police house until the 1880s and retained until demolition the barred windows of the room which was used as an overnight lock-up. ( Part of Church Street looking towards School Road, showing Currall, saddler and harness maker on the right, Wellesbourne 1910s (Edwards & Co Publishers Warwickshire County Record Office PH 350/2517)

21 Church Street looking from King’s Head 1910s: The view is from the back of the King’s Head and shows how full of trees this part of the village then was. Just out of sight on the left was the former cockpit. (21 Church Street, Wellesbourne 1910s) (Antona – Warwickshire County Record Office PH 352/193/15)

22 Frederick Anslow succeeded his father in a long established business. Peaceful scene in the Warwick Road, with Anslow, grocer, on the right. (Wellesbourne 1920s) (Antona – Warwickshire County Record Office PH350/2529)

23 Frederick Anslow’s shop which long doubled as the village post office with its post and telegraph boys outside. (View of Warwick Street, now Warwick Road, Wellesbourne. A group of men and boys are standing on the corner of the street. 1910s (Warwickshire County Record Office PH 350/2530)4)

24 The oldest pub in the village, beginning as the Wellesbourne Inn owned by the Lucys of Charlecote from its establishment in the mid-17th century until 1892; its stables can be seen on the right. The later village Mops (hiring fairs) were held on its land. Exterior of The King’s Head Hotel with the church behind. Wellesbourne 1920s (Warwickshire County Record Office PH 350/2527)

25 Tea gardens: Set up in the 1920s to attract the new Ordnance Survey carrying summer excursionists by G H Thomas, who in addition to managing the general stores in Bridge Street ran a garden design business which contributed to his displays. Converted in harsher times to the popular Fountain transport café. The Tea Gardens on the Warwick Road were a delightful place to have tea and cakes on a sunny afternoon, Wellesbourne. 1929 (Warwickshire County Record Office PH 350/2528)

26 The Talbot: Built as an inn in the early 18th century with a talbot (a now extinct breed of hound, used in heraldry) as its prominent sign, and much expanded in the 19th century when it competed energetically for trade with the King’s Head. It was owned by the Mordaunts of Walton, and their tenants paid their rents there. In the distance the war memorial can be seen in its original position on this tiny piece of ‘village green’ at the end of Warwick Road, watched over by Major Thesiger who lived in Emsdene (see 19). It was moved to the churchyard in 1947 as traffic became heavier. The Talbot Hotel, situated on the corner of the Warwick Road and Bridge Street, Wellesbourne. The girl with the bicycle was Christine Oldham (later Grantham). 1920s (Antona – Warwickshire County Record Office PH 352/193/23)

27 Central Cottages: Wellesbourne Hastings’ first council houses, built in 1922, at the same time as Granville Road in Wellesbourne Mountford, and perhaps photographed here because they were a new advance in housing for the village – a move away from the near-slum conditions in many of its areas. The railing to the left of the picture surrounded the war memorial (see 26) In the distance beyond the new houses there is a glimpse of Thorpe’s Garage and The Chestnuts, a typical late 18th century Warwickshire farmhouse. Semi-detached houses known as Central Cottages, Wellesbourne 1920s [These houses were built by a local builder called JT Thorpe in 1929] (Warwickshire County Record Office PH 352/193/34)

28 Beyond the house where West’s bakery had been established in 1912 can be seen the draper’s shop run by successive generations of the Overbury family. The corner shop on the Warwick Road, Wellesbourne. Anslow the Grocer, was also the Post Office and Telegraph Office. 1910s (Warwickshire County Record Office PH 352/193/35)

29 Wellesbourne House: The house began life as a modest hunting box (The Lodge) built in 1819. Most later owners extended it and in the late 19th/early 20th century William Low, American and rich, made it into a mansion in size and in the lavishness of its entertainment. His estranged wife Daisy later founded the Girl Scouts in the USA. One of the family’s large collection of motor cars is in the foreground. Wellesbourne House, Wellesbourne 1910s (Antona – Warwickshire County Record Office CR 2649/8)

30 Wellesbourne Hall: The house of c1690 was probably built by Robert Boyse and went on to be owned over two centuries by the Dewes/Granville family. It stood on or near the site of a much older manor house. The house was rescued from the threat of demolition in the 1950s, though the orangery shown in the picture was demolished as was the partly obscured 19th century service block on the right. Wellesbourne. Wellesbourne Hall. Rear of house and lawns (Warwickshire County Record Office PH(N)600/522/2)

31 Wellesbourne Hall: The house of c1690 was probably built by Robert Boyse and went on to be owned over two centuries by the Dewes/Granville family. It stood on or near the site of a much older manor house. The house was rescued from the threat of demolition in the 1950s, though the orangery shown in the picture was demolished as was the partly obscured 19th century service block on the right. Wellesbourne. Wellesbourne Hall. Front of house (Warwickshire County Record Office PH(N)600/522/3)2/193/35)

32 Stratford Road sign: The view is over the field known as Kings Croft, a tantalising and unexplained name. Wellesbourne. Road into village. Church tower just visible (Warwickshire County Record Office PH(N)600/522/2)

Further images and information:

 

Windows on Warwickshire

 

Our Warwickshire

 

We are very grateful for the information which has been provided by Rosalind and Peter Bolton

Please note that these images are copyright protected